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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 6a

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 6a: Scientific Revolution

Standard WH II:
The student will demonstrate knowledge of scientific, political, economic, and religious changes during the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries by
Objectives:
SOL 6a) describing the Scientific Revolution and its effects.

Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:
Pioneers of the scientific revolution
• Nicolaus Copernicus developed heliocentric theory.
• Johannes Kepler discovered planetary motion.
• Galileo Galilei used telescope to support heliocentric theory.
• Isaac Newton formulated law of gravity.
• William Harvey discovered circulation of the blood.
Importance of the scientific revolution
• Emphasis on reason and systematic observation of nature
• Formulation of the scientific method
• Expansion of scientific knowledge

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

Biography Reading Analysis Directions

Copernicus and the Scientific Revolution Video Analysis

Kepler to Galileo Letters Primary Source

Scientific Revolution Biography Reading Analysis

 

 

Video below to be used with Copernicus and the Scientific Revolution Video Analysis:

 

 Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

 

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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 5a,b,c,d: Impact of Europeans on East Asia, Africa, India, and Ottomans

Standard WH II:
The student will demonstrate knowledge of the status and impact of global trade on regional civilizations of the world after 1500 A.D. (C.E.) by

Objectives
SOL 5a) describing the location and development of the Ottoman Empire.
SOL 5b) describing India, including the Mughal Empire and coastal trade.
SOL 5c) describing East Asia, including China and the Japanese shogunate.
SOL 5d) describing Africa and its increasing involvement in global trade.

Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:

SOL 5a:
Original location of the Ottoman Empire
• Asia Minor
Expansion and extent of the Ottoman Empire
• Southwest Asia
• Southeastern Europe, Balkan Peninsula
• North Africa
Development of the Ottoman Empire
• Capital at Constantinople renamed Istanbul
• Islamic religion as a unifying force that accepted other religions
• Trade in coffee and ceramics

SOL 5b:
Location of the Mughal Empire
• North India
Contributions of Mughal rulers
• Spread of Islam into India
• Art and architecture: Taj Mahal
• Establishment of European trading outposts)
• Influence of Indian textiles on British textile industry
Trade with European nations
• Portugal, England, and the Netherlands competed for the Indian Ocean trade by establishing coastal
ports on the Indian sub-continent.
• Southern India traded silks, spices, and gems.

SOL 5c:
China
• Creation of foreign enclaves to control trade
• Imperial policy of controlling foreign influences and trade
• Increase in European demand for Chinese goods (tea, porcelain)
Japan
• Characterized by a powerless emperor controlled by a military leader (shogun)
• Adopted policy of isolation to limit foreign influences

SOL 5d:
African exports
• Slaves (triangular trade)
• Raw materials (ivory, gold)
African imports
• Manufactured goods from Europe, Asia, and the Americas
• New food products (corn, peanuts)

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

Premium Lesson Plans: National Geographic Video Secrets and Mysteries of the Taj Mahal
Note: The video appears to be difficult to find online. You may be able to order one from National Geographic.
http://natgeotv.com/asia/secrets-of-the-taj-mahal

Ottoman Japan China Mughals Analysis Chart for use with notes

Africa China Japan and India Impacts of Trade with Europeans Chart Project
Note: With the above chart I normally assign it as a class project. Each group completes their section of the part and presents it to the class.

Note: The above chart activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 4e and 4f

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 4e and 4f: Atlantic Slave Trade

Standard WH II:
The student will demonstrate knowledge of the impact of the European Age of Discovery and expansion into the Americas, Africa, and Asia by
Objectives:
e) mapping and explaining the triangular trade;
f) describing the impact of precious metal exports from the Americas.

Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:

SOL 4e and 4f
The triangular trade linked Europe,
Africa, and the Americas. Slaves, sugar,
and rum were traded.
Export of precious metals
• Gold and silver exported to Europe
and Asia
• Impact on indigenous empires of the
Americas
• Impact on Spain and Intentional trade

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

Joseph Cinque Amistad takeover ship on Middle Passage

Tobacco Economy and Slave Life Analysis     Tobacco Economy and Slave Life Analysis for use also with Tobacco Economy video hosted at the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation: http://www.historyisfun.org/video/tobacco-economy/
Note: With the above Tobacco Economy activities I only use the document analysis portion comparing slave life with that of the slave-master.e

Tobacco Economy Jamestown Video Guide: Show the video here and have students complete the lesson on the video.

12 Years a Slave Video Lesson Plans and Worksheet: Might be used for an end of the year/unit activity. May also be good to show a clip of it in class and discuss it.

Crash Course World History: Atlantic Slave Trade. Students write down any 5 facts.

Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 4d

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 4d: Columbian Exchange

Standard WH II:
The student will demonstrate knowledge of the impact of the European Age of Discovery and expansion into the Americas, Africa, and Asia by

Objectives
SOL 4d) describing the Columbian Exchange, including its impact on native populations.

Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:

Columbian Exchange
• Western Hemisphere agricultural
products, such as corn, potatoes, and
tobacco, changed European lifestyles.
• European horses and cattle changed
the lifestyles of American Indians.
• European diseases, such as smallpox,
killed many American Indians.
Impact of the Columbian Exchange
• Shortage of labor to grow cash crops
led to the use of African slaves.
• Slavery was based on race.
• European plantation system in the
Caribbean and the Americas destroyed
indigenous economics and damaged
the environment.

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

Columbian Exchange Chapter Review

Columbian Exchange Reading Analysis

Section Summary Columbian Exchange

Crash Course World History: Columbian Exchange. Student’s name 5 facts from clip OR address the following questions:

  • 1. Explain the exchange of disease.
  • 2. What are some Old World animals brought to the New World?
  • 3. List some New World plants brought to the Old World.
  • 4. What is the relationship between new world plants and population growth?
  • 5. What was brought to the New World to work the farming fields and plantations?
  • 6. What do you think, is the world better off with or without the Columbian Exchange?

Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 4b, 4c

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 4b, 4c: Age of Discovery; Age of Exploration

Standard WH II:
The student will demonstrate knowledge of the impact of the European Age of Discovery/ Age of Exploration and expansion into the Americas, Africa, and Asia by

Objectives
SOL 4b) describing the influence of religion.
SOL 4c) explaining migration, settlement patterns, cultural diffusion, and social classes in the colonized areas.

Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects

Essential Knowledge:
SOL 4b: Means of diffusion of Christianity
• Migration of colonists to new lands
• Influence of Catholic and Protestant colonists, who carried their faith, language, and cultures to new lands
• Conversion of indigenous peoples

SOL 4c
Americas
• Expansion of overseas territorial claims and European emigration to North and South America
• Demise of Aztec and Inca Empires
• Legacy of a rigid class system and dictatorial rule in Latin America
• Forced migration of Africans who had been enslaved
• Colonies’ imitation of the culture and social patterns of their parent countries Africa
• European trading posts along the coast
• Trade in slaves, gold, and other resources Asia
• Colonization by small groups of merchants (India, the Indies, China)
• Influence of trading companies (Portuguese, Dutch, British)

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

Powerpoint Activity Explorer Land Claims Map
Use this Map: Map of World 1500

Crash Course World History Video on Explorers and the Messy Legacy of Columbus

Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 4a

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 4a: Age of Exploration; Age of Discovery

Standard WH II 4
The student will demonstrate knowledge of the impact of the European Age of Discovery and expansion into the Americas, Africa, and Asia by
Objectives
4a) explaining the roles and economic motivations of explorers and conquistadors.Standard WH II:
Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:
Factors contributing to the European discovery of lands in the Western Hemisphere
• Demand for gold, spices, and natural resources in Europe
• Support for the diffusion of Christianity
• Political and economic competition between European empires
• Innovations of European and Islamic origins in navigational arts
• Pioneering role of Prince Henry the Navigator

Establishment of overseas empires and decimation of indigenous populations
• Portugal: Vasco da Gama
• Spain: Christopher Columbus, Hernando Cortez, Francisco Pizarro, Ferdinand Magellan
• England: Francis Drake
• France: Jacques Cartier

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

Magellan Voyage Reading

Magellan Biography Reading

Massacre at Tenochtitlan

Portuguese Reach India

The Spears Aztec

Crash Course: Christopher Columbus. Students name 5 facts from the video.

 

Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

 

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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 3a, 3b, 3c

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 3a, 3b, 3c: Reformation, Counter-Reformation, and Printing Press

Standard WH II:
The student will demonstrate knowledge of the Reformation in terms of its impact on Western civilization by

Objectives:
SOL 3a: explaining the effects of the theological, political, and economic differences that emerged, including the views and actions of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Henry VIII, and Elizabeth
SOL 3b: describing the impact of religious conflicts, the Inquisition, and Catholic Reformation on society and government actions.
SOL 3c: describing changing cultural values, traditions, and philosophies, and assessing the role of the printing press.
Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:

SOL 3a: Conflicts that challenged the authority of the
Church in Rome
• Merchant wealth challenged the Church’s view of
usury.
• German and English nobility disliked Italian
domination of the Church.
• The Church’s great political power and wealth
caused conflict.
• Church corruption and the sale of indulgences
were widespread and caused conflict.
Martin Luther (the Lutheran tradition)
• Views: Salvation by faith alone, Bible as the
ultimate authority, all humans equal before God
• Actions: 95 theses, birth of the Protestant Church
John Calvin (the Calvinist tradition)
• Views: Predestination, faith revealed by living a
righteous life, work ethic
• Actions: Expansion of the Protestant Movement
King Henry VIII
• Views: Dismissed the authority of the Pope in
Rome
• Actions: Divorced; broke with Rome; headed the
national church in England; appropriated lands and
wealth of the Roman Catholic Church in England
Queen Elizabeth I
• Anglican Church
• Tolerance for dissenters
• Expansion and colonialism
• Victory over the Spanish Armada (1588)

SOL 3b: Reformation in Germany
• Princes in Northern Germany
converted to Protestantism, ending
the authority of the Pope in their
states.
• The Hapsburg family and the
authority of the Holy Roman Empire
continued to support the Roman
Catholic Church.
• Conflict between Protestants and
Catholics resulted in devastating
wars (e.g., Thirty Years’ War).
Reformation in France
• Catholic monarchy granted
Protestant Huguenots freedom of
worship by the Edict of Nantes (later
revoked).
• Cardinal Richelieu changed the
focus of the Thirty Years’ War from
a religious to a political conflict.
Catholic Reformation
• Dissenters prior to Martin Luther:
Jan Huss, John Wycliffe
• Counter-Reformation:
– The Council of Trent reaffirmed
most Church doctrine and
practices.
– The Society of Jesus (The Jesuits)
was founded to spread Catholic
doctrine around the world.
– The Inquisition was used to
reinforce Catholic doctrine.

SOL 3c: Changing cultural values, traditions,
and philosophies
• Growth of secularism
• Growth of individualism
• Eventual growth of religious
tolerance
Role of the printing press
• Growth of literacy was stimulated by
the Gutenberg printing press.
• The Bible was printed in English,
French, and German.
• These factors had an important
impact on spreading the ideas of the
Reformation and the Renaissance.

 

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

SOL 3a:

Reformation Poster Project

Reformation Reading 95 Thesis

 

SOL 3b:

 

SOL 3c:

None. Students copy down notes.

Supplementary Videos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1o8oIELbNxE

Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

 

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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 2d

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 2d Major Trade Routes

Standard WH II:
SOL 2d The student will demonstrate an understanding of the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in the world about 1500 A.D. (C.E.)
Objectives:
Analyzing major trade patterns.
Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:
Traditional trade patterns linking
Europe with Asia and Africa
• Silk Routes across Asia to the
Mediterranean basin
• Maritime routes across the Indian
Ocean
• Trans-Saharan routes across North
Africa
• Northern European links with the
Black Sea
• Western European sea and river
trade
• South China Sea and lands of
Southeast Asia
Importance of trade patterns
• Exchange of products and ideas

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

 

Crash Course History: Silk Road. Students name 5 facts learned about the Silk Road. Teacher can pause and discuss points made in the video.

Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

 

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Lesson Plans World History II SOL 2a

Lesson Plans World History II SOL 2a Major Empires

Standard WH II:
2a The student will demonstrate an understanding of the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in the world about 1500 A.D. (C.E.)
Objectives
a) locating major states and empires.
Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:
Major states and empires in the
Eastern Hemisphere
• England
• France
• Spain
• Russia
• Ottoman Empire
• Persia
• China
• Mughal India
• Songhai Empire
Major states and empires in the
Western Hemisphere
• Incan Empire
• Aztec Empire

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

Blank Map of World 1500

Ottoman Empire and Venice, Italy Video Analysis: Students name 5 facts learned from the Video

 

Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

 

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World History II Lesson Plans SOL 2b

World History II Lesson Plans SOL 2b: Renaissance

Standard WH II:
2b The student will demonstrate an understanding of the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in the world about 1500 A.D. (C.E.)
Objectives
Describing artistic, literary, and intellectual ideas of the Renaissance
Lesson Plans
Introduction: A Bell-ringer activity
Notes: Students copy-down and discuss teacher generated notes
Activities: Students complete various in class activities to support learning including video analysis, maps, charts, diagrams, graphic organizers, worksheets, text-book questions, group discussion, KWL Charts etc.
Assessment: Informal, Formal, Exit-Questions, Teacher Questioning. Quizzes, Tests, Projects
Essential Knowledge:
Renaissance
• “Rebirth” of classical knowledge;
“birth” of the modern world
• Spread of the Renaissance from the
Italian city-states to northern Europe
Contributions of the Renaissance
• Accomplishments in the visual arts:
Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci
• Accomplishments in literature
(sonnets, plays, essays): Shakespeare
• Accomplishments in intellectual ideas (humanism): Erasmus

Activities That Support Lesson Plans

Desiderius Erasmus Primary Source Reading

VIPs of the Renaissance Reading

Note: The above activities are best used with the Virginia Prentice Hall World History: The Modern Era textbook.

 

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