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AP Psychology Lesson Plans and Worksheets

AP Psychology Lesson Plans and Worksheets

While I never had an opportunity to teach the AP Psychology Lesson Plans and Worksheets (though I did receive training before we moved out of state), I thought it might be nice for other AP teachers to take advantage of the guides provided. Documents are either pdf or doc/docx.

Teacher’s Guide for AP PsychAP Psychology Teachers Guide

Google Site: AP Psych File Cabinet: Includes lessons, PowerPoints, docs, articles, pdfs for 15 different units. Includes test-prep review materials: The AP Psych File Cabinet

40 Studies: A book that covers the 40 most important studies for Psychology. Includes student worksheets and questions

40 Studies Book

40 Studies Summary

40 Studies that Changed Psych Worksheet

40 Studies Student Question Sheet

Old AP Tests used for practice exams
2008 AP Psych MC Exam and Key

2007 AP Psych MC Exam and Key

2004 AP Psych MC Exam and Key

1994 AP Psych MC Exam and Key

1996 AP Pysch MC Exam and Key

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Archeology Lesson Plans

archeology-lesson-plans

Archeology Lesson Plans

While I never had an opportunity to conduct a unit of Archeology Lesson Plans or a stimulated dig, I did have some notes and worksheets related to it. I figured this would be a 3-5 day unit.

Day 1: Archeology Lesson Plans
Discussion of what Archeology is and isnt
Why it is important
What skills or knowledge is needed
Learn about scientific method/forming hypothesis and how it may apply to Archeology
Maybe have students do a reading on a famous archeologist (or provide short snippets/bios from famous ones). Probably want to select a diverse group (male, female, minority, etc). Then discuss and share it.
Possible career research to being an Archeologist?

Day 2: Archeology Lesson Plans
Discussion of techniques (probably pick 5 techniques that are the most common)
What to do/What not to do
Maybe a video showing the techniques
Students then practice techniques
Students then critique each other

Day 3: Archeology Lesson Plans
Prep 5-10 different archeology topics: Mayans, Aztec, Roman, Greek, Indian, China, 1800s, 1900s, Egyptian, Viking, etc. Pick a variety of topics and have students research the life of a commoner and rich person.
Students should focus on
Food, clothing, physical objects, religious symbols, etc,
Students should complete some sort of chart that gives facts/info on different aspects of a common/rich persons life in each of the above topics
You may need to prep this on the internet and have students visit a website to learn more about daily life

Day 4:Archeology Lesson Plans
Continue research

Day 5-6:Archeology Lesson Plans
Simulated Dig
Depending how you want to organize students may select a box or students may be randomly assigned a box.
Students then use the techniques they learned about to analyze a shoebox and dig it.
Students complete a recording sheet where they describe what they found, where they found, the number of the object, and the measurements of the object.

There are several ways to present the dig. You could do the shoebox and put sand and objects in it. You could buy large tots or bins and fill it with sand and then put objects in it to make it a larger area. You could dig into the school yard property and place items. Obviously, if you have more classes it will take much longer to prep all the “digs”.

You would obviously need to purchase items related to the different topics/cultures. Items that students could find in a dig such as bones, skulls, jewelry, clothing etc. may be purchased cheap around halloween/dollar store. Shoe boxes can be gotten from a shoe store (ask the manager), trowels, measuring tape (probably a fabric one) and other digging items may be purchased from Lowes/Home Depot, the dollar store, Goodwill etc.

Day 7-8:  Archeology Lesson Plans
Students create a report on what they found and their hypothesis of the culture/kind of person.
Students present findings
Teacher shares answers

Day 9-10: Archeology Lesson Plans
Students watch a hollywood film and compare and contrast real-life Archeology to how it is portrayed on the screen. Students complete a worksheet on the film and then compare and contrast.

Here is an outline of some sources that I found to be helpful in sketching out my Archeology Lesson Plan idea.

Archeology Lesson Plan Outline
Basic Stimulated Dig
Shoe Box Dig
Schoolyard Dig
Sample Recording Sheet
What students need to know briefing
Layer Cake Archaeology

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80th Infantry Division World War One

80th Infantry Division World War One

The purpose of this page is to display images and research information related to the 80th Infantry Division in World War One.

80th Baseball Game

80th Liberty Theatre

80th Cooks and Bakers School

 

 

80th Rifle Range

80th Bayonet Practice

80th Division Officers

80th Over the Top

80th Athletic Activities

80th in Town

80th Flag Signalling School

 

80th Mess Tin

80th Gas Mask Bag

 

Source:

History of the 80th Division, AEF in World War One
Complied by Russell L. Stultz, division historian
Edited by: Lee S Anthony, Ph. D. Commander
Jamont Communications 2004
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World War II Combat Lessons and Army Talks

Combat Lessons and Army Talks

Army Talks

These are a series of pamphlets produced several times a month throughout the war for soldiers. The pamphlets contained articles, combat tips, proclamations, maps, drawings, cartoons, news, updates and other general information.

Some links download from this site while other links go to my dropbox account. If DropBox gives you errors or cannot connect, please try clearing your browser’s cache, cookies and disable any third party-plugins (such as adblocker or Privacy Badger) as they may interfere with the ability of DropBox to render the pdfs. Special thanks to the 90th ID for making some of these available.

http://dlxs.richmond.edu/w/wtp/titlebrowse.html

http://www.wartimepress.com/archives.asp?TID=Army%20Talks&MID=Army&q=37&FID=36

Volume I: Army Talks

Vol I. No. 10, Battle of Atlantic 12-01-1943

Volume II: Army Talks

Vol. II, No 2, Two Years of War (12 Jan. 1944) Vol. II, No 5, The Good General (2 Feb. 1944)
Vol. II, No 8, France (23 Feb. 1944)
Vol II No. 12, The Army is quite a thing, 3-22-1944
Vol. II, No 15, Teamwork (12 Apr. 1944)Vol. II, No 16, Brains, Guts and Concrete (19 Apr. 1944) Vol. II, No 17, Queen of Battle (26 Apr. 1944)
Vol. II, No 25, See yourself as Jerry sees you! (21 Jun. 1944)
Vol II No. 27 July 1944 Notes from NormandyVol. II No. 29 Air Power, 7-19-1944Vol. II, No 30, Seven against the World! (26 Jul. 1944)
Vol II No 32 Aug 1944 What You Should Know about FranceVol. II No. 33, Red Army Man,8-16-1944
Vol. II No 37 Sept 1944: Combat MedicineVol II No. 39 Sept. 1944: What German POWs Say About YouVol II No 40 Oct 1944: What to do with Germany
Vol II No. 42 1944-04-19: China 7 years at WarVol II No. 43 Nov 1944: What to do with War Criminals Vol. II, No 45, Blueprint for WWIII (2 Dec. 1944)

Volume III: Army Talks

Vol. III, No 1, The Army in Europe (13 Jan. 1945)Vol. III, No 3, How to blunt a blitzkrieg (27 Jan. 1945) Vol. III, No 5, How to keep house in a foxhole (10 Feb. 1945)
Vol III No. 7 Feb 1945: We Came as ConquersVol. III, No 9, Homefront USA and Total War (17 Mar. 1945)
Vol. III, No 11, Operation Jackson (31 Mar. 1945)

Combat Lessons

The Rank and file in combat, What they are doing, How they are doing it. The suggestions in Combat Lessons are drawn from the experience of the World War II American Soldier in both Europe and the Pacific.

Volume 1 Volume 2Volume 3Volume 4Volume 5
Volume 6 Volume 7Volume 8Volume 934th Infantry Division: Lessons Learned in Combat Sept 1944
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WordPress Emails and Robots

WordPress.com Emails and Robots

WordPress Emails and Robots

This is an analysis of the different kinds of emails WordPress.com sends out when specific actions are triggered. This is from the recipients perspective. Note, that WordPress.com does not allow customization of these emails due to security concerns. Also mentioned is a review of the different kinds of WordPress.com robots and how to remove them.

New Post Email

This image below is an example email that is sent out when a user signs up to receive new posts. Your new post emails would look the same except for images, content, and contact information.

WordPress.com New Post Emails
WordPress.com New Post Emails

Invited Viewer Without Message Email

When you invite a user to your site, particularly if it is private, WordPress.com gives you the option to add a message. This is what it looks like without a message.

Invited Viewer Email No Message
Invited Viewer Email No Message

Invited Viewer With Message Email

This is the email with a message.

Invited Viewer With Message
Invited Viewer With Message

Invited to be an Administrator Email

This is what the email looks like with a message when someone has been invited to be an admin.

Invited to be an Administrator
Invited to be an Administrator

Invitation Acceptance Email

When you are invited to a site you will need to accept. When you accept an invite WordPress sends you a confirmation email alerting you that you have accepted. The Pixelated part is where your username goes. Only the person getting the email would see it.

Invitation Acceptance
Invitation Acceptance

Following Blog Email

This email is sent out when a user follows your blog.

Following Blog Email
Following Blog Email

Domain Name About to Expire Email

WordPress alerts users who have a domain name that it is about to expire. This is what the email looks like. Note that you will continue to get these emails, even if cancel the domain name or you turn off automatic renewal.

Domain Name About to Expire Email
Domain Name About to Expire Email

Domain Name Expired Email

WordPress sends out an email the day after your Domain Name expires.

Domain Name Expired
Domain Name Expired

Robots on your WordPress.com Site

There are two kinds of robots. A sitting down robot on your WordPress.com site mean your domain name is nearing expiration. You can dismiss this robot by clicking “Dismiss” in the top right.

Robots on my WordPress site
Domain name nearing expiration

The other kind is a standing up robot. This means your domain name is has expired. This is the message that appears the day after your domain name has expired.

Robots on my WordPress site
Domain name has expired

Removing Robots

To remove robots you will need to select cancel domain on the robot screen. When you select cancel you will be prompted to explain why and you will need to tick a box noting that you understand the consequences of domain name cancelation.

This is what the screen look like after you submitted your domain name cancelation. Note that you will need to check your email for a cancelation confirmation.

Domain Name Cancelation WordPress.com
After submitting the reason you canceling this is the screen that appears.

WordPress.com Domain Name Cancelation Email

This is the email to cancel a WordPress.com domain name. It is the the last step. Once clicked there is no going back.

WordPress.com Domain Name Confirm Cancelation Email
WordPress.com Domain Name Confirm Cancelation Email

Domain Name Cancelation Notification Email

This email is sent out when the domain name has been canceled.

Domain Name Cancelation Notification Email
Domain Name Cancelation Notification Email

If you try to visit your site using your canceled domain name. WordPress.com gives you a message prompting you to get Domain Mapping.

Domain Mapping Prompt
Domain Mapping Prompt

MailChimp

While not a WordPress.com part, MailChimp is frequently used with WordPress.com users to manage newsletters. This is an example of an HTML email from the recipients perspective.

MailChimp HTML Email
MailChimp HTML Email
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Digital Storage

  1. Read the following link and identify at least two problems with digital storage:An Interview With Two Scientists On the Problem of Digital Storage
  2. Then read this link and answer the following questions:

Scientists Solve The Digital Storage Problem

A. How are scientists proposing to solve the problems with digital storage?

B. Why is this process better?

C. Explain how the storing of the data works (How are they encoding the information?)

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ASCII Art and Games

ASCII Art and Games

Directions: Create 3 rabbits, Convert an Image, and play a game for at least 10. minutes. When done answer the following Exit Questions on a half-sheet of paper.

ASCII Rabbits: Follow the instructions to create ASCII Rabbits. Will need a text-file or a Google Doc
http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Bunny-by-Typing-Characters-on-Your-Keyboard

Convert an Image into ASCII Art:
Find an image on the internet and upload it to the site. It will automatically convert it into ASCII
http://picascii.com/

Convert text into ASCII Art
Type a word in and adjust the settings. It will automatically convert it into ASCII art.
http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=display&f=Isometric3&t=Hello

ASCII Games:
Early computer games were text-based.

Try Oregon Trail
https://archive.org/details/msdos_Oregon_Trail_The_1990

Chess
https://archive.org/details/msdos_Chess_1981

Air Traffic Controller
https://archive.org/details/msdos_Air_Traffic_Controller_1985

House at the Edge of Time
https://archive.org/details/msdos_House_at_the_Edge_of_Time_The_1990

Draw in ASCII

http://asciiflow.com/